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Editor in Chief at Lachesis Publishing Inc. https://lachesispublishing.com contact me at joanna@lachesispublishing.com

Fun Friday Question of the Week: Win a Free Book!

Waynes-WorldWeek 9 in our Lachesis Publishing QUESTION OF THE WEEK! WIN A FREE BOOK! This week’s question is: You’re at a red light and your favourite song comes on the radio or mp3/ipod. Do you crank it up and sing along WAYNE’S WORLD style, not caring who sees you? Or do you leave the volume alone and listen along without the theatrics?

You have until midnight tonight (EST) to leave a comment HERE or on our BLOG to get your name put in a draw to win a free e-book! The winner will get to choose one e-book from our Lachesis Publishing site (winner’s choice!) and we will send it to him or her. On Saturday morning, I’ll post the winner’s name on our Lachesis Publishing blog and on my facebook page. I will also contact him/her on facebook as well. Good luck and happy reading!

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The Keeper Shelf: Three of My Favourite Romance Novels by Louise Clark (romance author)

Heyer, GeorgetteEvery reader has favourite books and every writer began as a reader. In fact, one of the best ways to learn how to write is to read, read, read, and read some more.

These days I have favourite authors rather than favourite books, but before I became a writer I was a reader and my keeper shelf was filled with books—a lot of them by Georgette Heyer.

I came to writing from a history background, not an English one, so I’d consumed all of Heyer’s Georgian and Regency romances I moved on to other authors writing historical romances. From there I moved on to contemporary romance, mystery romance and fantasy. I read broadly then and still do now. What I look for is characters I love, an entertaining plot and writing that pulls me in as it pushes the story along.

Heyer has vivid characterization and plot in every book and her writing style is wonderful. I’ve read all of her books at least twice and some many more than that.

devils_cub_1967The top of my favourites list has to be Devil’s Cub, hands down. Dominic is the archetypical bad boy hero who can be tamed by only one woman. He is perfectly matched by Mary, so practical and down-to-earth on the outside, but as reckless and daring as Dominic and just as stubborn inside. The book is packed with wonderful secondary characters and a plot that races from one disaster to the next, forcing everyone to reach deep inside themselves and become more than they were before.

Devil’s Cub is the sequel to These Old Shades, another wonderful story with characters who linger in memory. Much as I loved Leonie and Avon, though, I think Dominic and Mary surpassed them.

The Convenient Marriage, published two years after Devil’s Cub, has the same kind of non-stop action plot, a really good bad guy threatening the safety of the heroine, and a wonderful hero and heroine. Secondary characters flesh out the story and add complications and humour throughout. Love it.

Devil’s Cub and The Convenient Marriage are both set in the late Georgian period, a time period I am fascinated by. When I wrote my first novel, Dangerous Desires, I set it in the early years of the French Revolution, at the end of the Georgian era.

The Corinthian, the last on my list of three, is a true Regency. With the change of time period, Heyer also changes the tone of the story. The characters are more restrained, the plot, with it’s murder mystery element, reflects the contemporary murder mysteries Heyer was writing in tandem with her historical romances. As with the other books, the story is full of wonderful secondary characters whose interaction with the hero and heroine help them discover that they are meant for each other.

Over the years I’ve written both contemporary and historical novels. My first published novel (Second Generation) was a contemporary romance, while Dangerous Desires came out a few years later. I think it’s inevitable that I’d eventually blend the two genres together in a time travel novel.

paperbackbookstanding_849x1126 (1)Fighting Fate is a contemporary novel set in Boston. It focuses on a very contemporary woman, Faith Hamilton, whose life is complicated by her time travelling ancestor from pre-Revolutionary Boston, Andrew Byrne. Andrew is very much the roguish Georgian gentleman and when he visits 21st century Faith he causes no end of trouble for her. Andrew is countered by Faith’s 21st century hero, Cody Simpson. Cody is a computer geek who shouldn’t be sexy, but is. Andrew and Cody couldn’t be more different, but they come together to help Faith when trouble knocks. As with my favourite Heyer novels, Fighting Fate incorporates humour, fun secondary characters, and a hero and heroine I loved writing.

What are your keepers? Specific books? A special author? I’d love to hear about what you love to read.

Thanks for dropping by.

Louise

You can get Fighting Fate at Lachesis Publishing or on amazon.

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Get your free copy of More Than Passion by JoMarie DeGioia (Regency romance, historical romance, free book)

more-than-passion-500x724Today’s sneak peek is from the Regency historical romance More Than Passion by JoMarie DeGioia. Book 1 in the Dashing Nobles series. AND IT’S FREE!!!

What It’s About:

Geoffrey Kane, Earl of Kanewood refuses to feel anything more than passion. Four years ago, his fiancée betrayed him and he has no desire to experience that again so when he meets the beautiful Rebecca Kingsley, it’s passion at first sight. And only passion.

Rebecca has led a very quiet life working for her father at a small country inn. When she meets Geoffrey she falls in love with him right away. But she’s only the daughter of a baronet and men like Geoffrey never marry country girls like her. Do they?

When Rebecca’s father tries to marry her off to a wealthy old man, Geoffrey intervenes and marries her himself. He wants her very much but he couldn’t possibly love her. Love is for fools. At least that’s what he tells himself. But a sinister enemy soon threatens to destroy all that Geoffrey holds dear, forcing him to face the truth.

His marriage depends on it . . .

And maybe even Rebecca’s very life.

EXCERPT:

The Raven’s Inn was surprisingly elegant. The brick structure was trimmed with dark green, its long windows sparkling in the late afternoon sun. Rebecca Kingsley was straightening the beautifully-appointed parlor of the inn. Her father, Thomas, insisted that all the rooms look fine. His father had been a baronet, but all that was left of the family fortune, as it were, was the inn. As a younger man, he’d traveled in the social circles of the ton and claimed to know what the gentry and lesser folk alike looked for in food and lodging. Many travelers stopped at the inn, and they expected service and accommodations as fine as any in London, or so Rebecca’s father insisted.

At just twenty years old, Rebecca had been working at the inn all of her life. Her mother died when Rebecca was just two, leaving no real memories. Thomas refused to speak of her and Rebecca had long since given up asking. The only thing he’d say was that she took after her mother in looks. This he always said in a gruffly, affectionate manner that never failed to surprise her. She supposed she inherited her fair skin from her mother, that and her thick raven-black hair. She could never see anything of herself in Thomas.

He never really gave her much notice. She worked as hard as the servants at the inn, keeping her own room as well as half of the rest abovestairs. Mary, the chambermaid, took care of the other rooms as well as seeing to the guests’ personal needs. Rebecca served the morning and evening meals in the dining room, as well, along with Emmy. Emmy was funny and kind and a shameless flirt. She never hesitated to share her experiences with Rebecca, who couldn’t help but blush. She listened, though. Closely.

Rebecca was usually free to go about her own business after finishing her chores abovestairs. But this afternoon, she polished the candlesticks and dusted the furniture in the parlor. As usual, she wore her hair plaited in one long braid coiled at the back of her head. Her simple muslin gown was a few seasons old and well-suited to her task. She paused to gaze longingly out the window toward the stables out back. Beyond them, she could see the gently rolling hills over which she so loved to ride. If she didn’t have to see to the parlor today, she’d surely be out riding her black filly.

From her vantage point, Rebecca could see two figures walking out of the stable’s wide doors. One man was slight of stature and fell in step behind the other. The man in the lead was tall with broad shoulders and dressed in a brown coat and tan breeches. He walked with a long, easy stride. Sun glinted off hair she fancied the color of honey. He had a strong profile, and Rebecca couldn’t tear her gaze away from him. What color were his eyes?

“Fool,” she chided herself. She turned back to her work, flicking her dusting cloth in frustration.

* * *

She moved with an easy grace through the dining room, her glossy black hair catching the light given off by the candles. Curls framed the perfect oval of her face and teased the back of her neck. Her simple gown hugged her lush figure, the skirt swaying over her hips as she walked. She carried a pitcher of ale, and Geoffrey couldn’t take his eyes off her as she moved from table to table.

A man’s voice broke through his reverie. “Fetchin’, ain’t she?”

“What …?” He hadn’t even noticed the gray-haired man who joined him at his table. “Yes.”

“Peter Jenkins is the name,” the slight man offered. “How do you do?”

Geoffrey shook the man’s hand. “Kane. Geoffrey Kane,” he answered. “Very well, thank you.”

The older man gave a flick of his head in Rebecca’s direction. “She’s Kingsley’s daughter.”

Geoffrey raised an eyebrow at that. This beautiful creature was related to the florid-faced innkeeper? Impossible.

Just then, the girl approached the two men. Her mouth curved into a smile for the older man before she turned her attention to Geoffrey. Her rose-colored lips parted as she stared into his eyes for a long moment. “Blue.”

Geoffrey blinked. “What?”

She shook her head. “N-nothing.”

Geoffrey could only stare at the girl, dumbstruck. Her eyes were the color of emeralds, and sparkled as prettily. His gaze fell on her lips as she flicked her tongue over them. Desire shot through him, want like he’d never felt before. Once again, Peter’s voice broke in.

“Rebecca, this is Geoffrey Kane. Kane, meet Rebecca Kingsley.”

The girl, Rebecca, curtsied in greeting after a brief hesitation. She seemed as off-kilter as he felt, to his amazement. After a moment, Geoffrey stood and bowed slightly. “Miss Kingsley.”

“I’m pleased to meet you,” Rebecca said.

Her voice suited her. It was soft and a bit husky. And damn sensual.

“Likewise.”

“Will you be staying with us long?”

If I can help it. “A few days, actually,” he said, smiling.

She gasped softly, the sound no more than a whisper. “Well, do enjoy your stay,” she said, shyly returning his smile.

She stared up at him for a moment longer. Finally, she filled his tankard. With a nod of her dark head, she continued on through the dining room. Geoffrey sank back down into his seat, his gaze glued to her form.

“Rebecca.” He breathed. “Becca.”

Like what you’ve read? You can get More Than Passion by JoMarie DeGioia right here at Lachesis Publishing.

JoMarie DeGioia writes historical romances with a touch of mystery for Lachesis Publishing. And her books are always on the steamy side. Her Dashing Nobles series follows the romances of four male friends in Regency London.

You can get JoMarie DeGioia’s books right here at Lachesis Publishing, or on Amazon, Nook, Kobo and Itunes.

Connect with JoMarie DeGioia online on her web site and on facebook and on twitter.

Follow Lachesis Publishing on twitter and like our facebook page.

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Fun Friday Question of the Week: Win a Free Book!

the-allure-of-prize-linked-savings-accounts-32229Week 7 in our Lachesis Publishing QUESTION OF THE WEEK!

Every Friday we’re asking a question right here. You have until midnight tonight (EST) to leave a comment here or on our Lachesis Publishing Daily Blog to get your name put in a draw to win a free e-book! The winner will get to choose one e-book from our site (winner’s choice!) and we will send it to him or her. On Saturday morning, I’ll post the winner’s name here and on our Lachesis Publishing facebook page and contact him/her on facebook as well.

This week’s question is: YOU WIN TEN MILLION DOLLARS IN A LOTTERY. WHAT’S THE FIRST THING YOU WOULD DO WITH THE MONEY? THE VERY FIRST THING.

Good luck and happy reading!

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Five Reasons Why We Love Historical Romance Heroes by JoMarie DeGioia (Regency historical romance author)

just perfectNo matter the time period, there is just something about a hero from the past. Here is my take on some of the traits these guys possess and why they make them so darned irresistible.

  1. Historical romance heroes are usually quite skilled in the physical arts. I’m not just talking about horseback riding and fencing, either! A bit of experience under a hero’s waistcoat makes him the ideal lover and husband for the heroine. And sometimes we get a glimpse of his very delicious instructions to his previously-innocent lady love.
  1. Very often these heroes are rakes. Dashing and handsome gentlemen who, without effort, make women from a young coquette to an elderly matron fall under their spell. What woman doesn’t want the bad boy to flirt with? Now this is a romance hero, so we know he’s going to be reformed by the time he wins the heroine’s heart forever. And that’s even better!
  1. The social niceties play a big part in the courtship dance in historical romance. Gallantry is hot! Even if the hero is from “the other side of the blanket” he knows how he should behave in order to win the heroine’s heart. He could be a rough-and-tumble plantation owner or a disinherited younger son, but he will know the right way to treat a lady in and out of the boudoir.
  1. He breaks the rules. Rules are made to be broken, and no one breaks society’s confines like an historical romance hero! Holding the heroine just a little too close. Maybe for just a little too long. Meeting her on a secluded terrace when the mere hint of scandal could lead to ruin. Oh! These guys can convince their heroine to risk just about anything for them.
  1. He dresses the part. Lastly, there are the clothes. So many clothes! Tight breeches topped by a waistcoat, jacket, shirt and intricately-tied cravat? And what about a kilt? Unwrapping the hero can feel like Christmas arrived early, lol! Not to mention, how these guys love divesting their heroines of their petticoats and stays and stockings and layer upon layer of frothy lace. Ooh-la-la! It’s just pure deliciousness.

In writing this post I realize there are plenty more reasons why we just love these guys. Now, how about you? What makes you melt for the Historical Romance hero?

JoMarie DeGioia writes historical romances with a touch of mystery for Lachesis Publishing. And her books are always on the steamy side. Her Dashing Nobles series follows the love lives of four male friends in Regency London.

You can get JoMarie DeGioia’s books right here at Lachesis Publishing, or on Amazon, Nook, Kobo and Itunes.

Connect with JoMarie DeGioia online on her web site and on facebook and on twitter.

Follow Lachesis Publishing on twitter and like our facebook page.

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Free books? Join our cool new Book Reviewers Club.

reading-cat-12We’re starting a Book Reviewers Club at Lachesis Publishing!

If you join you will get a free e-book in exchange for a review.

We want YOU to help US spread the word about our books to as many locations on the web as possible such as Amazon, Nook (BN), Kobo, blogs, facebook, twitter etc . . .

If you’re interested contact LeeAnn Lessard, Publisher Lachesis Publishing at leeann.lessard@sympatico.ca

Please note: Kitty not included. ;)

Happy Reading! :)

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Q and A Tuesday (Round 2) with David Lee Summers (horror/parnormal and science fiction author)

S FALL COVEROur Round 2 Q and A  is with Lachesis Publishing author David Lee Summers. David has written several horror and science fiction novels for Lachesis including The Pirates of Sufiro which is free, and Dragon’s Fall: Rise of the Scarlet Order.

What was your favourite book as a child and why?

Two books stand out for me from my childhood. The first is Where the Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak. I was captivated by the lush illustrations and the simple, yet evocative language. The Wild Things scared me as a kid, but Max impressed me by taming them and becoming their king. The other book is Pecos Bill: The Greatest Cowboy of All Time by James Cloyd Bowman. It was the first chapter book I remember reading. I loved the fact that it was a fantasy set in the Wild West. It included elements from the stories my mom, dad, uncles, and aunts told me about homesteading in New Mexico, but ramped them up and made them even wilder. Really, I think this book more than any other laid the groundwork for me learning how to adapt stories from my life into science fictional or even horrific settings.

Who was your favourite teacher growing up and why?

My favorite teacher was Elfriede Mayor. We called her “The Frau.” She taught both high school German and journalism. In her German class, I learned a love of language and words. I also discovered the original Grimm Fairy Tales and learned they were much darker than I thought. In her journalism class, I learned to express myself and write regularly and how to do a word count.

One time, I wrote an editorial criticizing the school’s policy of covering natural areas with blacktop. The school board actually wrote a letter demanding an apology. The Frau stood beside me and said I owed no apology, that I had presented a fair criticism and supported my opinion. I never forgot that lesson in democracy and standing up for my opinions.

When did you know you wanted to be a writer? Why?

When I was about eight or nine years old, my parents bought me the book The Trouble With Tribbles by David Gerrold. It told the story of how Gerrold wrote and sold the episode of the same name to Star Trek. At the time, I liked making up stories and writing them down. Gerrold showed me it was possible to do that for a living. I was hooked by the idea.

Who in the writing/publishing world do you admire and why?

This is a difficult question because there are so many people I admire, but if I have to pick just one, I’ll go with Ray Bradbury. He spent years in the library reading great works, then used the lessons from that time to become a great writer in his own right. He transcended genre and defies classification. He wrote poems, short stories, novels, plays and screenplays. He used whatever medium worked best for the story he wanted to tell. He went from an unknown, penniless writer to one of the best known, best loved writers of all time. When I first met him in 1983, he was literally one of the nicest people I ever met. Even as a teenage kid who’d barely written anything, he made me feel like a peer. What’s more, he had a great family life and raised four daughters. He helped many other writers get started in the world and he always supported other writers. When my story “The Slayers” appeared in Realms of Fantasy Magazine, he wrote me a note congratulating me. Ray Bradbury is the person who comes to mind not only when I think of the kind of writer I want to be, but the kind of person I want to be.

Tell us about your daily writing routine – what do you typically do every day?

My “day” job is operating telescopes at Kitt Peak National Observatory. This is a job I do from sunset to sunrise for six nights out of every fifteen, hence the reason “day” is in quotes! When I’m on duty at the observatory, writing is irregular, especially during the long nights of winter. However, when I’m off duty, I try to spend quality time writing.

On a typical writing day, I wake up and have breakfast and coffee while checking my email. I then shut that down to avoid distractions and write for a couple of hours. From there, I’ll take a walk to get some fresh air, clear my head, and think about the next scenes. When I return home, I typically write for a couple more hours, then break for lunch. After lunch, I may run errands, or catch up on social media. If I have time before my wife and kids get home, I’ll usually get in one more afternoon writing session. Evenings are for family. We share dinner and often enjoy a good science fiction show or even a scary movie.

What is your favourite snack or guilty pleasure food that you (may or many not ;) indulge in when writing?

My writing day always starts with a steaming mug of black coffee beside me. It’s a critical part of my writing process. I also like to snack on nuts when I write. Cashews are a particular favorite. I also love habanero almonds. A square of chocolate often serves as my reward for a successful writing day.

HEIRS OF THE NEW EARTH COVERWhat does “writing voice” mean to you? Describe your own writing voice.

“Writing voice” is the way a writer puts words together to present a narrative. For some writers it’s informal and fun as though they’re sitting in the room chatting with you and relating a story. For others, it can be more gothic and poetic, as though they’ve picked each word with the utmost care. Because of my background writing papers in astronomy, I think my writing voice is clear and direct. Many have described my writing voice as similar to Ernest Hemmingway’s, which I take as a great compliment.

What do you want to accomplish in the next five years in your writing career?

We live in a multimedia world and I’d love to see my works transcend the printed page and move into audio books or even visual media of some sort. Over the next five years, I would love to learn more about what I can do to turn that dream into reality. In addition to that, I plan to complete my Clockwork Legion steampunk series for Sky Warrior books and hope to complete my Wilderness of the Dead horror series for Lachesis.

It’s the season to give thanks. What are you thankful for?

I am thankful for publishers such as Lachesis Publishing that have believed in me and published my books. I am thankful to my family for standing by me and supporting me, even when times have been difficult.

piesPumpkin pie or Pecan pie?

As someone who loves to munch cashews and almonds, and as someone who lives in one of the great pecan growing regions of the United States, I have to go with pecan pie.

Connect with David Lee Summers. online via facebook and twitter, and check out his web site.

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